Happiness

“Depressed Daddy-less Daughters”
How Religion Helps Veterans
Health and Well-Being by Religious Affiliation
Child Well-Being and Parents’ Marriage
Religious Practice Strengthens Social Bonds
Parental Modeling Affects Children’s Future Relationships
Health and Spirituality
Family Mealtime has Positive Effects on Youth’s Psychosocial Outcomes
Family Mealtime Sown at a Young Age Results in Thriving
Family Meals Boost Emotional Well-Being Among New Zealand Youth
Family Meals Decrease Risk of Mental Disorders Among Iranian Youth
Family Meals Yield Positive Psychosocial Outcomes Among Adolescents
Father Engagement Reduces Stress in their Adolescent Child
Father Engagement Reduces Depressive Affect and Promotes Cognitive Development
Paternal Involvement Increases Children’s Quality of Life
Family Connectedness Protects Elderly Patients from Committing Suicide
Family dinners have major adolescent mental health implications, but certain family structures and employment arrangements make them much more or much less likely.
Family Dinners Mediate the Relationship between Cyberbullying and Adolescent Mental Health
Family Meals Are Good for Adolescents
Family Breakfasts and Adolescent Well-Being
Family Dinners, Mental Health Benefits and Protection from Cyberbullying
Family Structure Influences Suicidal Ideation and Attempts
Family Structure Influences Adolescent Health and Health Behaviors
Family Cohesion and Conflict: Impact on Children’s Health and Well-Being
Religious Upbringing Promotes Well-Being in Adulthood
Religious Upbringing Promotes Well-Being in Adulthood
Religion Is Good For Your Mental Health
Meaning In Life and Positive Religious Coping Strategies Linked to Less Loneliness
People Who Go To Church Are Healthier and Happier
Attachment Style Influences Relationship Satisfaction and Parent-Infant Bonding
Productivity Benefits of Freedom of Religion in the Workplace
Faith When There Is No Workplace
Adolescents OK with Having a Child Out-of-Wedlock
Women’s Premarital Cohabitation is Inversely Associated with Marital Happiness
Religion Promotes Mental Health and Well-Being
Married Persons are Less Lonely than Cohabitors and Single Persons
Religion and Family are Pathways to Human Flourishing
Religious Participation Exerts Powerful Effects on Human Flourishing
Parental Warmth Leads to Their Children Flourishing
Parents’ Marital Quality Impacts Their Children’s Physical Health
Married Koreans Have Higher Life Satisfaction
Men and Women Perceive Marital Quality Differently
Men and Women Perceive Marital Quality Differently
High Marital Quality Translates into Better Health
Religion Increases Marital Quality
When Fathers See Their Infants, Brain Activation and Testosterone Levels Increase
Gratitude Decreases Attachment Anxiety
Couples Who Express Gratitude Stay Together and Are More Satisfied In Their Relationship
Gratitude Promotes a Positive Outlook in Relationships
For Iranian Muslims, Religiosity and Hope Mediate the Association Between Attachment Style and Life Satisfaction
Greater Marital Quality, Better Health
Elderly with Children Have Greater Longevity
Women’s Premarital Cohabitation is Inversely Associated with Marital Happiness
Attachment to God Improves Job Commitment
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Happiness by Family Structure and Religious Practice

Family Structure: According to the General Social Survey, 34 percent of adults who lived in an intact family as adolescents considered themselves very happy, compared to 26 percent of those who lived in a non-intact family.     Religious Practice: The 1972-2006 General Social Survey shows that 34.1 percent of adults who attended religious services at least monthly as adolescents considered themselves very happy, compared to 28.9 percent of adults who attended worship less than monthly as adolescents. Family Structure and Religious Practice Combined: About 35 percent of adults who attended religious services at least monthly and lived in an intact family through adolescence considered themselves very happy, compared to 23 percent of adults who attended religious services less than monthly and lived in a non-intact family as adolescents. In between were those who had attended religious services at least monthly but lived in a non-intact family (26 percent) and those who lived in an intact family but attended religious services less than monthly (30 percent). The combination of frequent religious attendance during adolescence and an intact family background clearly increases the likelihood of being very happy in adulthood. The data indicate, however, that family structure may have a more pronounced effect than religious attendance. Related Insights from Other Studies: Very few studies have examined contemporaneous effects of both religious attendance and family structure on happiness, let alone intergenerational effects, but these studies generally support the direction of these findings. Arthur Brooks of Syracuse University reported that while “practicing a religion makes people very happy, on average,” married people are “nearly twice as likely as singles” to report being very happy.[1] In a study of Caribbean adolescents, Robert Blum of the University of Minnesota and colleagues found that adolescents who report having religious beliefs and connectedness with their parents are less likely to experience rage.[2] Though the evidence demonstrates that an intact family may have a greater influence than religiosity on the likelihood of being very happy, the combination of frequent religious attendance and an intact family yields the highest proportion of very happy people, as adolescents and adults.   [1] Arthur Brooks, Gross National Happiness (New York: Basic Books, 2008): 28, 30, 217, 227. [2] Robert Blum, et al., “Adolescent Health in the Caribbean: Risk and Protective Factors,” American Journal of Public Health, vol. 93 (2003): 456-460.]]>